Edward Lear Concert at Knowsley

The Edward Lear Society is planning an event at Knowsley Hall on 7th March 2019 with Sara Lodge’s presence who, in addition to an illustrated talk on her latest book, Inventing Edward Lear, will present a performance of songs that Lear wrote, sang or re-worded, with reflections and new discoveries regarding his musical life, art and poetry.

Piano: David Owen Norris
Tenor: Mark Wilde
Words: Sara Lodge

David Owen Norris is a prominent pianist, composer, and broadcaster who will be familiar to many from his lively and entertaining performances at the BBC Proms, presenting ‘Chord of the Week’ and the Radio 4 Playlist series.
http://www.davidowennorris.com/

Mark Wilde, noted for his ‘clear, unstrained, distinctive tenor’ (Gramaphone), is a Professor of Singing at the Royal Academy of Music. He has performed with Glyndebourne Festival Opera, English Touring Opera, the Academy of Ancient Music, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra among many eminent musical partners. His recordings, for labels including Hyperion, Naxos and EMI, span repertory from Haydn to Elgar and Britten.
http://jamesblackmanagement.com/artists/category/tenors/markwildetenor

Sara Lodge is a writer and academic, based at the University of St Andrews. Her new book, Inventing Edward Lear (Harvard University Press, 2018) is the fruit of seven years of research, during which she transcribed over 10,000 pages of Lear’s letters and diaries. Her research has led to many new discoveries and insights into Lear’s life and work, especially the richness of his sound-world and the range of his musical influences.
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/people/academicstaff/lodge/

There is a limit of 30 people therefore RSVP is essential by mid-December: info@edwardlearsociety.org.

You can dowload the full programme in PDF format here.

The day at Knowsley also includes lunch and a tour of the extraordinary animal and bird watercolours and lithographs by Lear in the Knowsley collection. Knowsley itself is usually closed to the public, so access to this historic home is unique.

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