Edward Lear, Coloured Views in the Seven Ionian Islands

From a coloured copy of Views in the Seven Ionian Islands (1863).
folio (497 x 333 mm). (λίγα στίγματα οξείδωσης στον τίτλο). Λιθόγραφος τίτλος με βινιέτα και 20 λιθογραφίες χαραγμένες από τον Lear με βάση σχέδιά του, ΟΛΕΣ ΕΠΙΧΡΩΜΑΤΙΣΜΕΝΕΣ ΜΕ ΤΟ ΧΕΡΙ, 2 φύλλα στην αρχή (εισαγωγή και πίνακας λιθογραφιών), 21 φύλλα με επεξηγηματικά κείμενα (ένα για τη βινιέτα και από ένα για κάθε λιθογραφία) και ένα φύλλο με κατάλογο συνδρομητών στο τέλος. Αρχικό πράσινο πανί (τίτλος με χρυσά γράμματα στο πάνω κάλυμμα, 2 ex-libris, το ένα του Earl of Dartmouth). Blackmer 987, Weber, I, 1183, Παπαδόπουλος (Iονική) 4288. – ΠΟΛΥ ΚΑΛΟ ΑΝΤΙΤΥΠΟ.
[folio (497 x 333 mm). (a few spots of oxidation on the title). Lithograph title with vignette and 20 lithographs engraved by Lear from his designs, ALL COLORED BY HAND, 2 leaves at the beginning (introduction and table of lithographs), 21 leaves with explanatory texts (one for the vignette and one for each lithograph) and a subscriber list sheet at the end. Original green cloth (title lettered in gold on upper cover, 2 ex-libris, one by the Earl of Dartmouth). Blackmer 987, Weber, I, 1183, Papadopoulos (Ionic) 4288. – VERY GOOD COPY.] Google translation.

invaluable.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, A Group of Owls

Edward Lear, A Group of Owls, from Birds of Europe, c. 1835.
A group of 5 lithographs with hand-coloring on wove paper, printed by C. Hullmandel, London.

Barn Owl – Strix flammea; Barred Owl – Strix neblosa; Great Cinereous Owl – Strix Lapponica; Eastern Great Horned Owl – Bubo Ascalaphus; Little Owl – Strix nudipes (5). 19 1/2 x 13 1/2in (49.5 x 34.3cm).

Bonhams.

More from the same auction (not Lear):

John Gould & H.C. Richter (British, 1804-1881), A Group of Owls, from Birds of Europe and Birds of Great Britain, c. 1830; c. 1870.
A group of 5 lithographs with hand-coloring on wove paper, one printed by C. Hullmandel, London, the others printed by Walter, London, with margins, each framed.

Tawny or Wood Owl – Strix aluco; Bubo maximus; Snowy Owl – Nyctea nivea; Syrnium aluco; Strix flammea. 19 1/2 x 13 1/2in (49.5 x 34.3cm).

Bonhams.

And:

John Gould (British, 1804-1881), A Group of Owls, from Birds of Great Britain and Birds of New Guinea, c. 1865.
A group of three lithographs with hand-coloring on wove paper, printed by Mintern Bro’s and Walter, London with margins, together with R. Milford, Long Eared Owl, engraving with hand-coloring on wove paper, with margins, each framed.

Ninox forbesi; Ninox odiosa; Athene noctua (4)
each sight 19 1/2 x 13 1/2in (49.5 x 34.3cm)
each framed 26 3/4 x 20 1/2in (67.9 x 52.1cm)

Bonhams.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, S. Gregorio & Tivoli

Edward Lear, Tivoli and San Gregorio, a pair, the first inscribed ‘Tivoli’ (lower left); the other inscribed and dated ‘S.Grigorio [sic]/23rd April’ (lower left).
Pen and ink and wash, heightened with white. The first 7 x 17.2cm (2 3/4 x 6 3/4in); the second 8.6 x 17.2cm (3 3/8 x 6 3/4in).

Provenance
With Squire Gallery, London.
Anon. sale, Mallams, Oxford, 3rd October 2012, lots 197 and 198.
Private collection, UK.

Bonhams.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, Turbìa (1864)

Edward Lear, Turbìa (La Turbie in southeastern France, 31 December 1864.
Watercolour and ink with traces of pencil. 36 x 53.5cm.

Erroneously titled “Turkish Landscape, Dec. 1864” at MutualArt.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, the Caetani and Ninfa

My essay is now out and available either on Amazon and the publisher’s website.

Marco Graziosi, “Prima di Gregorovius: Edward Lear, i Caetani e Ninfa.” In Ninfa: Percezioni nella scienza, letteratura e belle arti nel XIX e all’inizio del XX secolo, ed. Michael Mateus, Regensburg: Schnell + Steiner, 2022, pp. 165-192.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, A Palm, Agrigento, Sicily (1847)

Edward Lear, A Palm, Agrigento, Sicily (1847).
Ink on paper. 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. (sheet), 17 x 14 1/2 in. (frame).

MutualArt.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Edward Lear, Two Early Botanical Studies (1828)

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Reviews of the Ikon Exhibition: Edward Lear Moment by Moment

I’m starting a tour of Wales &c. today and will be away for a couple of weeks, but I want to recommend again the Ikon exhibition in Birmingham, and in particular the great catalogue, with essays by Matthew Bevis, Jenny Uglow, Adam Phillips, Hugh Haughton and Stephen Duckworth; don’t miss it if you go, or order it from the bookshop.

The Guardian.

Apollo: The International Art Magazine.

Prospect.

The Spectator.

 

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Edward Lear, Civita d’Antino (1844)

Edward Lear, Civita d’Antino
Pencil, chalk and white heightening. Signed, inscribed and dated, 1844. 6.5×11.25 inches. Framed: 15.5×19 inches.

Illustrated
Edward Lear, ‘Excursions in Italy’, 1846, plate 20.

Provenance
John Scandrett Harford (1787-1866), who first met Lear in Italy in 1846.

Abbott and Holder.

Posted in Edward Lear | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

On Lear’s Rebus (again)

Hayley Gold (@hayleyrabbit) – a sample of her artwork is here above while her books are available here – and I are unconvinced  by the seller’s interpretation of the Edward Lear rebus I posted some time ago and have been trying to find a different solution for some time, but without great success. I am therefore reposting it asking for my readers’ help, if they are any better than I am at this sort of thing.

The fact is the sentence resulting from the gallerist’s interpretation does not make much sense, or it is too contorted for what it purports to say; anyway, here is the current solution explained to the best of our understanding:

Bull’s eye = “I”
Pile of wood = “would”
Bee = “be”
Haystack = “a”.  This one is frankly unconvincing, what is the ladder doing there, such a complex word for an article? [perhaps only “hay” with wrong aitch, that Lear found so oppressing].
Grate = “great”
R R (2Rs) = “arse”. Not likely, Lear, I think, would have drawn an ass.
Inn = “in”
Manuscript = “writing”
Shoe + D = “should”
Eye = “I”
Knot = “not” [couldn’t it be a Ribbon?]
Hat = “at-” [see note on “hay” above + Taking aim = “aim” + T = “attempt” [?!]
2 = “to”
People Fording a stream = “afford” [where does “af-” come from? “a ford” I suppose]
Hook to Catch fish = “catch”
The = “the”
Muse = “Muse”.

Which makes it “I would be a great arse in writing should I not attempt to afford to catch the Muse.”

Are there any experts in rebuses out there that can help us find a better solution? Please let us know.

Posted in Edward Lear | Leave a comment